Dinosaurs Relatives

Here is a catalog of creatures that lived during the Dinosaur periods, but were not really dinosaurs. Numerous are considered 'relatives of the Dinosaurs', others are ocean creatures that existed in the ancient oceans. Click on every one to find out more about them. They are scheduled in alphabetical order.

Ammonites

Ammonites are an extinct collection of marine animals of the subclass Ammonoidea in the class Cephalopoda, phylum Mollusca.Read More...

Archelon

Archelon was enormous marine turtle (a chelonian), the biggest that has ever lived.Read More...

Belemnites

Belemnites(or elemnoids) are an extinct collection of marine cephalopod, very parallel in many ways to the modern squid and closely related to the modern cuttlefish.Read More...

Dimetrodon

Dimetrodon (meaning: two events of teeth), was a rapacious synapsid genus that flourished during the Permian age and was a arnivore.

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Dimorphodon

Dimorphodon was a species of medium-sized pterosaur from the premature jurassic period.Read More...

Dsungaripterus

Dsungaripterus (meaning: Wing of Junggar Basin) was a pterosaur by means of a wingspan of 3 metres (10 feet).

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Elasmosaurus

Elasmosaurus (meaning: thin-plated lizard) had plate like bones in its pelvic girdle and was a plesiosaur with an enormously long neck that lived in the belatedly Cretaceous period.

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Eryops

Eryops (meaning: drawn-out face) because mainly of its skull was in front of its eyes, is a species of extinct, semi-aquatic amphibian. The primary genus of Eryops has been named Eryops megacephalus (large head).Read More...

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Hesperornis

Hesperornis is an extinct species of flightless aquatic bird that lived during the Coniacian to Maastrichtian sub-pochs of the belatedly Cretaceous (89-65 million years past).Read More...

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Ichthyosaurs

Ichthyosaurs (meaning fish and lizard) were huge marine reptiles that resembled fish and dolphins.Read More...

Kronosaurus

Kronosaurus was one of the ocean reptiles known as pliosaurs a member of the plesiosaur group, but in the Pliosauridae relations, with the characteristic feature of a much shorter, thicker neck.Read More...

Mosasaurs

Mosasaurs were huge, serpentine (snake-like) marine reptiles. They were not dinosaurs, but were linked to snakes and monitor lizards.

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Nothosaurs

Nothosaurs were Triassic marine sauropterygian reptiles that may have lived similar to today's seals. It lived during the whole Triassic period.

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Plesiosaurs

Plesiosaurs were carnivorous marine reptiles. The common name plesiosaur is applied both to the true plesiosaurs and to the bigger taxonomic rank of Plesiosauria, which includes together long-necked and short-necked forms.Read More...

Pteranodon

Pteranodon from the tardy Cretaceous of North America was one of the biggest pterosaur genera..Read More...

Pterodactylus

Pterodactylus was a pterosaur, a little, flying reptile, with a wingspan of about 50–75 cm (20–30 inches) that lived on Lake Coast during the Late Jurassic Period. It was a carnivore and most likely preyed upon fish and other small animals.Read More...

Quetzalcoatlus

Quetzalcoatlus was a pterodactyloid pterosaur known from the belatedly Cretaceous period of North America and one of the biggest known flying animals of all time.Read More...

Tylosaurus

Tylosaurus was a mosasaur, a big, predatory marine lizard closely related to contemporary monitor lizards and to snakes. Along with plesiosaurs, sharks, fish and other genus of mosasurs, it was a dominant predator of the Western Interior Seaway during the Upper Cretaceous era.Read More...

Rhamphorhynchu

Rhamphorhynchus was a long-tailed pterosaur of the Jurassic stage. Its name means 'beak jaw'. Only 17.5 cm (7 in) lengthy but with a wingspan of 100 cm (3 feet), it was less specialized than the afterward pterodactyloids.Read More...

Trilobite

Trilobites are extinct arthropods that appeared in the 2nd Epoch of the Cambrian era and flourished throughout the lower Paleozoic period before beginning a drawn-out decline to extinction when, during the Late Devonian extermination, all trilobite orders, with the sole omission of Proetida, died out.Read More...